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We help companies to innovate successfully.

Sunidee is an innovation agency from Amsterdam with offices in Hong Kong and Paris.

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Thursday
Sep132012

In today’s crazy world strategy is dead, the big idea is dead, management is dead and marketing, as we know, is also dead. 

The Drum published an article by Richard Drycott that caught my eye.

Could there be a much more radical statement of mind?! Regardless of my personal opinion about strategy, the big idea, management and marketing, I love challenging statements. Especially when somebody with a lot of authority is trying to reach us. Who is this person?

Addressing an audience of senior business leaders at The IoD’s Annual Convention taking place at London’s 02, Kevin Roberts, CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi Worldwide, claimed that in today’s crazy world strategy is dead, the big idea is dead, management is dead and marketing, as we know, is also dead.



First of all, Roberts is describing the world around us. "We don’t just live in a VUCA world - a volatile, uncertain, ambiguous and complex world - we live in a super VUCA world. We live in a vibrant world where our kids are connecting to each other and to brands across the world with no money involved. To us this is a world that’s gone crazy."

"Strategy is dead. Who really knows that is going to happen anymore in this super VUCA world? The more time and money you spend devising strategies the more time you are giving you rivals to start eating your lunch."

"Management is dead. To win today you need a culture and an environment where the unreasonable power of creativity thrives. Ideas are today’s currency not strategy."

"The big idea is dead. There are no more big ideas. Creative leaders should go for getting lots and lots of small ideas out there. Stop beating yourself up searching for the one big idea. Get lots of ideas out there and then let the people you interact with feed those ideas and they will make it big.”

“Marketing is dead. The role of marketing has changed now. There is nothing new anymore. If marketers are just hearing about something going on then it is already old in today’s world. The further up in a company you go the stupider you become and the further away from new things. Speed and velocity is everything today. Marketing’s jobs is to create movement and inspire people to join you."

“Everyone wants a conversation. They want inspiration. Inspire people with your website. Don’t just interrupt, but interact. Asking about Return on Investment is the wrong question today. You should be asking about Return on Involvement.”

Ready for an inspiring conversation? Call me on this number +31 (0)654375057 or send me an email on egbert-jan@sunidee.com
Wednesday
Sep122012

Twiet.nu: a shopwindow for your webshop

This weekend I stumbled upon an interesting shopwindow when walking through The Hague.


Webshops can rent a small box in the shopwindow to show their offering, being able to attract the attention of window shoppers. Each box also shows a QR-code, making it easy to access a webshop of your choice if you see something you like.

I think twiet.nu has found an interesting way to link the real world to the online world. The "different" look of the shop window made me curious when passing by. I can imagine this is also an interesting concept in places where people are waiting and have the time to browse around web shops, like at bus stops, stations, barber shops and so on.
Monday
Sep102012

Business Model War Game - a battle of business models

It is the time of year that most companies start to rethink their strategy and business models. An effective way to think out of the box in strategy formulation is to organise a Business War Game. SunIdee has developed a special version of such a War Game to help companies rethink their business model in a strategic context: the Business Model War Game.

Are you curious how this works in practice? View our slideshare or visit www.businessmodelwargame.com.



The results of your war game will be summarised in a movie clip, making it easy for you to share results with colleagues. Let us know if you would like to offer your colleagues a whole new experience!


Are you new to War Games or Business Model Innovation? Read on:

Business War Games
Business war gaming provides vital insights into market dynamics and possible future scenarios, and is a great way to engage the organisation in strategy formulation when the competitive environment is undergoing massive change. By simulating moves and countermoves in a commercial setting, it gives new insight into how different companies can react to change, as well as to each other. These insights are crucial for developing a robust strategy that enables your organisation to win in the marketplace.

In many battles that have been fought in the marketplace, the market leader found himself outsmarted by a competitor with a completely different culture and behaviour. Not feeling limited by any of the unwritten business rules, this competitor makes smart moves by altering the business model. Some examples: changing launch windows (Zara), creating product-service systems (iPod / iTunes), building ‘long tail’ portfolios (Netflix), changing pricing structures (Google auctioning off search terms), and many more. This is why we believe a business model approach to war games adds value.

Business Model Innovation
Read our blog on Business Model Innovation
Monday
Sep102012

Celebrating 10 years of SunIdee: Dr. Innovation

Suffering from innovation illness, and no idea where to go? Come visit Dr. Innovation at SunIdee.


In the past 10 years we have gained tremendous experience in diagnosing innovation illnesses, treating them and keeping companies healthy. And you can now benefit from this!
To celebrate our 10-year anniversary we introduce Dr. Innovation's freely accessible consulting hours. Every Friday morning during our anniversary year - starting Friday September 21st, you can visit Dr. Innovation in our Amsterdam office from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Two SunIdee innovation specialists will be available to provide first aid in all your innovation injuries, illnesses or issues. Making an appointment is not necessary, but we advise you to let us know if you want to discuss a specific topic so we can make sure our topic-expert will be present.

4 easy steps to feeling better:
  1. Leave early to beat traffic jams
  2. Have a croissant with a delicious coffee at SunIdee
  3. Brainstorm with one of our innovation specialists
  4. Go to your office and share your new ideas with colleagues
When:
Every Friday from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Where:
SunIdee Headquarters
Prinsengracht 739-741
1017 JX Amsterdam
Monday
Sep102012

Xylobands: get the crowd involved

Last Thursday I visited the Coldplay concert in The Hague. Being only 1.63m tall I prefer to visit live performances in clubs, because on a big field it is hard for me to see anything at all between the tall Dutch people. For that reason (apart from the music off course), the most interesting thing at a concert is probably the lightshow as it is the only thing I really see.

At the Coldplay gig everybody received a Xyloband, and it is probably the coolest thing I have ever seen in a live show. I realized it fits two of my consumer insights when I visit a show like this:
  1. When I'm in the back of the audience, I enjoy the show less. It is hard to see anything at all and the crowd around me also seems to be less enthusiastic. It would be great if the entire audience would feel part of the show.
  2. I started visiting concerts around the age of 12 and have been keeping my concerts tickets in a box until a few years from now. The electronic concert tickets nowadays are not worth saving, because they are too ugly and somehow don't feel "special". However I still think it is great to have something small to remember a show.
The Xylobands involve entire audience and are nice souvenir to take home. Apart from that, they look amazing.

Tuesday
Sep042012

"Steal like an artist" from Austin Kleon. Part 4

In his book “Steal like an artist”, Austin Kleon lists “10 things nobody told you about being creative”. Although Kleon writes from an artist perspective, I think that his guide –with the right interpretation - also perfectly fits the business world. Therefore I will – as Kleon calls it – emulate the rules and put them into my business perspective.
For the coming weeks, I will focus on one of his principles each week. This is week 4 out of 10.

4. Use your hands.

"Step away from the screen"

Please do. You won’t find interesting new things when constantly distracted by your emails and you won’t find real customer insight reading research from behind your desk.



If you want to find new ideas and insights, get out of your office. If you want to come up with new ideas with your team, don’t go to a standard meeting room.

Making things tangible also helps. Tangible innovation tools are a great way to make complex matters simple. Tangible tools help to make the discussion more focused and get an overview of the problem. Just by structuring your ideas by putting them on the wall can create an overview you can never on your screen. Just look at the picture below to see what I mean. The computer is a great tool to process ideas and finalise them, but behind your screen is probably not the best place to come up with them.

So to repeat Kleon once more: “step away from the screen”.

This post is based on the guides to creativity in the digital age “Steal like an artist” from Austin Kleon.
If you like this post, please come back next week for part 5: “Side projects and hobbies are important.”
If you’re curious about the book, visit Austin Kleon’s website.
Tuesday
Sep042012

There are now more consumer trends than you can swing a stick at!

Just published by Trendwatching.com: September 2012 Trend Briefing 12 Mini Consumer and Business Trends

Trendwatching.com is one of my favorite websites. What’s great about the Trendwatching site is that it is international, well illustrated and always inspiring. I use the information during our innovation workshops. Take a good look and be inspired!

In a world of global hyper-consumption and creative destruction, there are now more consumer trends than you can swing a stick at. Here's just a small selection of 'mini' consumer and business trends that are currently on our radar. And to underscore just how global the game has become, the mini-trends are accompanied by examples from Dubai, France, South Africa, the US, Brazil, the Netherlands, Indonesia, Kenya, China, Spain, Colombia, Japan and many more.

Thursday
Aug302012

“Eureka! I have a great idea. A brilliant idea!”

Do you recognise this feeling? The feeling that you have a truly great idea, so great in fact that you wonder why you didn’t think of this before. The truth is that you probably have been thinking about it for a while and that even though it seems like the idea pops up out of nothing, the building blocks have been around for some time in your mind.

Most often, an idea is created by a new combination of elements you already are familiar with. Steven Johnson explains how this works in his wonderful animated drawing.



How can we create these moments of creativity and innovation when we want to? By bringing together a multidisciplinary team of creative people and guiding them through a creative process, using the right tools.

There are an enormous amount of different brainstorming techniques out there, and we have tried and tested many of them. We found that association techniques based on visual aspects works best, which is why we developed BrainBricks. BrainBricks help brains to create new combinations of existing elements, exactly as Steven Johnson explains in his movie clip. Get your own set of BrainBricks in our webshop andy give it a go!
Monday
Aug272012

"Steal like an artist" from Austin Kleon. Part 3

In his book “Steal like an artist”, Austin Kleon lists “10 things nobody told you about being creative”. Although Kleon writes from an artist perspective, I think that his guide –with the right interpretation - also perfectly fits the business world. Therefore I will – as Kleon calls it – emulate the rules and put them into my business perspective.
For the coming weeks, I will focus on one of his principles each week. This is week 3 out of 10.

3. Write the book you want to read.

Work can (and should) be fun! If you are truly passionate about an idea, it is so much easier to work on it. You know the feeling that you are really into the flow and suddenly 3 hours have passed while it felt like 15 minutes. And I don’t mean that in the stressful, deadline sense; I mean this in the loving your job sense.

That is why I believe in working in a multi-disciplinary project team. That way, the people that came up with an idea continue working on the idea. They choose this idea because they believe in it and not because somebody else said they should do it. In addition, this also prevents miscommunication because people working on the project have created a shared view in the beginning. Making me think of this picture I dug up from my swipe file.



This post is based on the guides to creativity in the digital age “Steal like an artist” from Austin Kleon.
If you like this post, please come back next week for part 4: “Use your hands.”
If you’re curious about the book, visit Austin Kleon’s website.
Sunday
Aug262012

The Lego story: fail forward to success.

The rise, fall and comeback of the 'brick'.

As The LEGO Group celebrates its 80th Birthday, they take a look back at its history with an animated film. It shows that innovation is hard work, and requires personal drive and persistence to turn innovation into a successful business.



We all know that Lego experienced very hard times in the last decade, almost going bankrupt in 2004, but they managed to get their act together. Some of the things they did: restructuring the product portfolio and reducing the number of products from 13,000 to 6,000, selling off some properties, licensing the amusement park business and videogame business to people who actually know how to run it and reducing their product development cycle from idea to launch by 50% to one year. And the brick made a comeback!
If you want to know more, I recommend you watch this ABC News video from 2009.


But in all of its history, the greatest achievement of Lego in term of innovation is that it ‘put a system into toys’. Thank you Lego! And happy birthday.
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